A League Of His Own

By Daniel Oliver and M.D.B. Carlisle 

The Washington Times

May 31st 2001

Much of the analysis of the decision by Sen. Jim Jeffords to switch parties is nonsense, especially the idea that he was mistreated by Senate Republicans. For starters, Sen. Trent Lott, in a move less than popular with his colleagues, permitted the Vermont senator to be chairman of the Education Committee, a gratuitously gracious move.

Republicans loyally supported his milk compact, an arrangement by which milk prices to consumers are artificially raised … Read more

McCain’s Not A Conservative

By Daniel Oliver

CBS News/National Review

February 19th 2008

John McCain is not a conservative, but I will vote for him anyway.

After all, in 1952, conservatives, grumbling that Ohio senator Robert “Mr. Republican” Taft had not been nominated, voted for Eisenhower because he was clearly the better alternative to Adlai Stevenson. And they voted for Ike again over Stevenson in 1956.

In 1971, a Who’s Who of conservatives, including the senior editors of National Review, suspended their support of President Nixon because of … Read more

Deciding Abortion

The key questions.

By Daniel Oliver

National Review

May 2nd 2005

 

The pro-abortion and anti-abortion forces are warships passing in the night. Their slogans, “pro-choice” and “pro-life,” don’t engage the central issue that divides them, which is, what actually happens in an abortion. Neither group really disagrees with the other’s slogan. None of the opponents of abortion would object to a woman’s choosing to do what she wanted with a tumor or some other unwanted tissue growing on or in her body. On … Read more

A Born Teacher

A review of Cancel Your Own Goddam Subscription: Notes and Asides from National Review by William F. Buckley, Jr., and of Strictly Right: William F. Buckley, Jr. and the American Conservative Movement by Linda Bridges and John R. Coyne, Jr.

By Daniel Oliver

The Claremont Review of Books

Spring 2008

A review of Strictly Right: William F. Buckley, Jr. and the American Conservative Movement by Linda Bridges and John R. Coyne, Jr.; and Cancel Your Own Goddam Subscription: Notes and Asides from National Review, … Read more

Conservatism and Civil Rights

By Daniel Oliver

Claremont Review of Books

Fall 2008 issue

As I read William Voegeli’s piece on William F. Buckley, Jr., and the civil rights movement, I thought, “Come on, Voegeli, make up your mind. Was Buckley right or wrong?” I concluded that Voegeli’s answer would be, “Yes.” Then I decided that, given the record, Buckley and the conservatives probably got a more balanced treatment from Voegeli than they would, and perhaps will, get from a lot of people.

No responsible person can regret … Read more

Accuracy Is Desirable

Conservatism finds itself at a rhetorical Crossroads.

By Daniel Oliver

The American Spectator

March 9th 2009

In 1837, a henpecked Jefferson Jackson, husband of a volcano known as Marjory (“yellin’ and screamin'”) Jackson and proprietor of the Crossroads Tea Shop in Crossroads, Tennessee, whispered to a frightened employee, “It takes a man with courage to make Marjory tea.”

His remark, which has come down to us as “It takes one brave man to make a majority,” has been attributed regularly to Andrew Jackson and … Read more

Richard Cohen’s Wild Moose Chase

Was it drink that caused him invoke Joe McCarthy against Sarah Palin?

By Daniel Oliver

The American Spectator

August 21st 2009

Liberals are getting worried now. Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen has played the McCarthy card against Sarah Palin.

Gov. Palin, expert moose hunter, is of course more than capable of looking after herself. But what does playing the McCarthy card say about the Liberals?

There are three points to remember about McCarthy. But first: no one should discuss McCarthy who hasn’t read Stan … Read more

Laughing Gas: A review of The Death of Conservatism by Sam Tanenhaus

With The Death of Conservatism, Sam Tanenhaus establishes himself as one of America’s premier comic geniuses in the field of political commentary.

By Daniel Oliver

The American Spectator

October 2009 issue

With The Death of Conservatism, Sam Tanenhaus establishes himself as one of America’s premier comic geniuses in the field of political commentary. There’s a guffaw waiting for you on almost every page. And like a good showman, he saves the very best for the very last.

The Death of Conservatism is … Read more

Nobody’s Pluperfect

Matt Latimer has written this year’s most entertaining book about what goes on — or doesn’t — in Washington.

By Daniel Oliver

The American Spectator

December 2009 – to – January 2010 issue

Matt Latimer has written this year’s most entertaining book about what goes on — or doesn’t — in Washington. This is a laugh-out-loud book with a serious message, for those willing to hear it. It has also generated controversy.

Latimer was a geeky kid from Flint, Michigan, who set out for … Read more

Reloading

A review of Going Rogue: An American Life, by Sarah Palin

By Daniel Oliver

The American Spectator

February 2010 issue

What’s not to like about Sarah Palin — for a conservative or a Republican? Her autobiography makes it abundantly clear why the liberal United Nations-hugging big-government socialist fascist gangster capitalist atheist God-hating running dogs don’t like her. But conservatives?

What are the three most important traits a conservative should look for in a president? A belief in God. A belief in a strong national … Read more